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Posts Tagged ‘Balanced Budgets’

Economic Choices: Between Terrible and Worse

August 3, 2011 1 comment


Can we be realistic here? The debt ceiling “compromise” signed into law Tuesday fixes nothing and ensures continuing uncertainty in financial markets and more ideological warfare in the months ahead. But congratulations Washington for putting the matches away and not burning the house down.

As all sides hold their noses while they get a good look at this really ugly baby, here’s what has not been accomplished.

Deficit Reduction: A little bit- but not much. $2.4 trillion over ten years against a $14 trillion debt with most of the cuts still to be determined by a “Super” committee of 12 angry, feuding lawmakers who start meeting around Thanksgiving. This ought to give us that much more to be grateful for.

Reduction in Entitlement Programs: They’re responsible for most of the debt but even the draconian cuts that automatically take place if our angry, feuding lawmakers can’t come to an agreement- don’t address Social Security, Medicaid or Medicare recipients. Some think this a good thing with a reeling economy causing so much misery but for a so-called attempt to bring spending in line, not a smart move to ignore consideration of the major contributors to the national debt.

Revenue: Two major commissions that set about to solve deficit-spending in the past year both came to identical conclusions. It cannot be accomplished by cutting alone. This is not about partisanship- it’s about math. There were plenty of Republicans on both these panels who endorsed the concept of raising revenue as a part of balancing budgets. See this column in the Washington Post that discusses these commissions and their discoveries. Alan Greenspan, one of the last human beings on the planet you would expect to favor tax increases is now in favor of exactly that. Blogged about it a few months ago.

Rational Process: We will forever more be holding future extensions of the nation’s debt ceiling hostage to the ideological flavors and fights of the day. This has nothing to do with party. Other than whichever party is out of the White House will, from now on, be pushing the nation’s economy to the brink in order to extract whatever it can from perpetually horrified future Presidents, Democrats and Republicans alike.

The Current Economic Mess: The 1,000 point Dow Jones meltdown that would have been expected had the debt ceiling not been passed was replaced instead by a 265 point meltdown out of fears stoked by today’s weak and struggling economy that the debt ceiling agreement does little to address.

But in the end, was it a good thing the debt ceiling bill passed? Well, as Alan Greenspan put it so eloquently in September of 2010, “Our choice is not between good and bad but between terrible and worse.”

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